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REGIONAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH STATION, ANAKAPALLE

MANDATE

  • To develop suitable sugarcane varieties for the state of AP
  • To develop suitable sesame varieties
  • Test centre for rice crop
  • Test centre for mesta
  • Develop suitable cultural practices for realising higher yields
  • Develop suitable resistant varieties that can withstand drought, water logged and rainfed situations
  • Develop pest and disease resistant varieties
2001- 2002
a. Name of the Research Station :

Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

b. Name of the Head of the Station:

Dr. K.Subrahmanyam
Associate Director of Research

c. Year of Establishment:

1913

d. Area in hectares:

41.74ha

1. Total area:

41.74ha

2. Dry:

9.90ha

3. Wet:

1.99ha

4. Irrigated dry:

17.45ha

5. Roads, buildings, Channels:

10.77ha

6. Grazing lands or pastures:

Nil

7. Cultivated area:

29.34

8. Cultivable but not cultivated :
during the year

-

9. Land not brought under cultivation:

Nil

10. Orchard:

1.63

e. Source-wise area irrigated in the station (Season)

Source of irrigation

Area irrigated (ha)

-

Kharif

Rabi

Total

Canals

Nil

-

-

Open wells

Nil

-

-

Tube wells

-

13.64

13.64

Any other source

Nil

-

-



Expenditure Statement of the schematic operations during 2001 2002
Major Head: 132 101 Non plan NCZ RARS, Anakapalle

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

9193000

7995140

1197860

2

Recurring contingencies

2800000

2739560

60440

3

Non-Recurring contingencies

70000

25980

44020

Total

12063000

10760680

1302320



All India Co-ordinated Research Project on Sugarcane

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

2056000

1212990

843010

2

Recurring contingencies

160000

159780

220

Total

2216000

1372770

843230



All India Co-Ordinated Research Project On Processing Handling & Stroage
of Jaggery & Khandasari at RARS, Anakapalle

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

973000

614630

358370

2

Recurring contingencies

80000

72270

7730

Total

1053000

686900

366100



Government of India-Starting of Agro Meterological Advisory Services at RARS, Anakapalle

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

46366

25116

21250

2

Recurring contingencies

25000

4250

20750

3

Telephone expenses

6000

6000

-

Total 77366 35366 42000


Particulars of schemes operating in the stations including extension schemes like E.E.U. for 2000-2001.

I. Non plan Scheme & Coordinated Projects.
(Separately for each functioning in the Station)

Sl.
No.

Name of the post

Non plan

AICRP ON SUGACANE

AICRP ON
JAGGERY

DST

S

V

S

V

S

V

S

V

1.

Associate Director of Research

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.

Principal Scientist(s)

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.

Senior Scientist

7

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

4.

Scientist

16

4

3

-

1

-

1

-

5.

Agricultural officer

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-



Name of the Scheme: Non-Plan, Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

S.No

Name of the post

No. of posts Sanctioned

Vacant

1.

Admn. Cum- Accounts Officer

1

-

2.

Office Superintendent

1

-

3.

U.D. Steno (Senior Assistant working against this post)

1

-

4.

Senior Assistant

5

-

5.

Jr.Asst. Cum-Typist

7

2

6.

Agril. Extension Officer

10

1

7.

Artist cum-photographer

1

-

8.

Electrician

1

-

9.

Drivers

3

-

10.

Tractor Drivers

2

-

11.

Oil Engine Drivers

2

-

12.

Mechanic

1

1

13.

Record Assistant

9

3

14.

Attender

7

1

15.

Agril. Workman

14

3

16.

Watchman

4

-

17

Sweeper cum Scavenger

1

1

Name of the Scheme: Non-Plan (VZM)

1.

Senior Assistant

1

-

2.

Jr. Asst. Cum-Assistant

1

1

3.

Agril. Extension Officer

2

-

4.

Attender

1

-

Non-Plan (Peddapuram) posts shifted from Peddapuram under NARP

1.

Agril. Extension Officer

1

-

2.

Attender

1

-

AICRP on Jaggery and Khandsari

1.

Mechanic

1

-

2.

Attender

1

-

ECF Scheme

1.

Agril Extension Officer

6

2

2.

Jr.Asst.Cum Typist

1

-

3.

Watchman

1

-



Number of Staff Quarters :-21
Teaching

Non-Teaching

Vacant

Occupied

Vacant

Occupied

1 14 - 6
Vacant Reasons: Associate Director of Research post is vacant. Principal Scientist -(Sugarcane) is incharge of the post of Associate Director of Research.


Man Power:

Particulars of incumbents in the station / scheme
Name of the scheme/station Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

Sl.No

Name

Designation

Period

1.

Dr.Prasada Rao. L.V.V

Associate Director of Research

10.1.19999 to 31.3.2002

2.

Dr. K. Subrahmanyam

Associate Director of Research

1.4.2002 to till to date

3

Dr.N.V.Naidu

Principal Scientist (Sugarcane)

4.10.2001 to till to date

4.

Dr.V.Raja Rajeswari

Senior Scientist (Plant Physiology)

30.4.1998 to till to date

5.

Dr.M.Bharatha Lakshmi

Senior Scientist (Agronomy)

30.7.1999 to till to date

6.

Dr.N.Venugopala Rao

Senior Scientist (Entomology)

20.4.2000 to till to date

7.

Vacant

Senior Scientist (Plant Pathology)

1.12.2000 to till to date

8.

Vacant

Senior Scientist (Agril. Economics)

1.12.1999 to till to date

9.

Vacant

Senior Scientist (Agril. Extension)

1.7.1998 to till date

-

Dr.N.V.Naidu

Senior Scientist (Breeding)

23.4.1994 to 3.10.2001

10.

Vacant

- do -

4.10.2001 to till to date

11.

Dr.K.Ramalinga Swamy,
Principal Scientist (SoilScience) & Vice Principal

Two Scientists (Soil Science)

5.10.1995 to till to date

12.

Dr.S.Rama Krishna Rao, Principal Scientist (SoilScience)

Senior Research Officer

3.12.1990 to till to date

13.

Sri.T.K.V.V.Mallikarjuna Rao

Scientist (Statistics)

27.4.1985 to till to date

14.

Dr.G.V.Nageswara Rao

Senior Scientist (Plant Pathology)

12.5.1997 to till to date

15.

Dr.K.Prasada Rao

Scientist (Breeding)

5.4.1996 to till to date

16.

Dr.V.Rajabapa Rao

- do -

17.5.1997 to till to date

17.

Dr.K.Subash Chandra Bose

Scientist (Plant Physiology)

20.8.1998 to till to date

18.

Dr.P.Jamuna

Senior Scientist (Soil Science)

27.5.1990 to till to date

19.

SmtT.Chitkala Devi

Scientist (Agronomy)

29.3.2001 to till to date

20.

Smt T.Suseela

Scientist (Horticulture)

25.6.1998 to till to date

21.

Smt V.Satya Priya Lalitha

Scientist (Breeding)

30.9.1998 to till to date

22.

Smt M.Charumathi

Scientist (Breeding)

20.10.1998 to till to date

23.

Dr.Ch.V.Narasimha Rao

Scientist (Entomology)

24.11.1998 to till to date

24.

Smt B.Bhavani

- do -

30.10.2001 to till to date

25.

Vacant

Scientist (Breeding)

5.4.1996 to till to date

26.

Vacant

Scientist (Agronomy)

1.2.1996 to till to date

27.

Sri P.V.K.Jagannadha Rao

Scientist (Agril. Engineering)

14.3.2002 to till to date

28.

Vacant

Scientist (Plant Pathology)

5.12.1998 to till to date

39.

Vacant

Scientist (Agronomy)

4.8.1999 to till to date

30.

Vacant

Senior Scientist (Breeding0

21.7.1998 to till to date

31.

Sri B.Rajendra Kumar

Agricultural Officer

13.7.2000 to till to date



NON -TEACHING PERSONNEL IN OCCUPATION FROM JUNE, 2001 TO MAY, 2002

S.No

Name

Designation

Period

1

Sri M. V. Ramanaiah

Admn. Cum-Accts. Officer

18.10.2000 to date

2

Sri D. Suri Babu

Superintendent

10.6.1999 to date

3

Sri P. Umamaheswara Rao

Sr. Asst. (Against U.D. Steno)

27.6.96 to date

4

Sri M. Venkateswara Rao

Senior Assistant

10.7.2001 to 31.8.01

5

Sri P. Venkata Rao

Senior Assistant

20.9.2001 to date

6

Sri K. J. Prasad

Senior Assistant

13.10.1995 to date

7

Smt. D. Neela

Senior Assistant

22.05.1996 to date

8

Sri G. Rajakumar

Senior Assistant

9.8.1996 to date

9

Smt. S. Umadevi

Senior Assistant

22.7.99 to date

10

Sri RRG. Atchuta Rao

Senior Assistant

16.8.2000 to date

11

Sri V. Suryanarayana

JACT

13.5.92 to 31.1.02

12

Sri KVS. Satyanarayana

JACT

10.8.1998 to date

13

Sri D. Jaggappa Rao

JACT

1.10.1997 to 2.1.2002

14

Sri V. Mohan Rao

JACT

23.1.2002 to 7.5.02

15

Sri Md. A. Mohiddin

JACT

25.1.2002 to date

16

Sri T. Govinda Rao

JACT

30.1.02 to date

17

Sri Ch.Sreenivasa Rao

JACT

8.5.02 to date

18

Sri G. Simhachalam

JACT

21.2.2002 to date

19

Sri K. Nooka Raju

Agril. Extn..Officer

18.2.1992 to date

20

Sri B. Pydaiah

Agril. Extn..Officer

16.9.90 to date

21

Sri K. Joga Rao

Agril. Extn..Officer

5.12.98 to date

22

Sri M. Subba Rao

Agril. Extn..Officer

8.6.97 to 31.1.02

23

Sri R. Appa Rao

Agril. Extn..Officer

10.2.02 to date

24

Sri M.V.N.M. Sarma

Agril. Extn..Officer

5.11.200 to date

25

Sri B. Satyanarayana

Agril. Extn..Officer

8.12.98 to date

26

Sri V. Rama Rao

Agril. Extn..Officer

5.12.98 to date

27

Sri Bh.Sivaram

Agril. Extn.Officer

3.11.2000 to 20.3.02

28

Sri G. Bheemeswara Rao

Agril. Extn..Officer

21.3.2002 to date

29

Sri P. Jagan Mohan Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

16.9.89 to date

30

Sri K. Trimurthulu

Agril. Extn..Officer

10.12.98 to date

31

Sri K.V.V.Gopala Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

4.11.2000 to date

32

Sri M.Gangadhara Sarma

Agril. Extn.Officer

21.12.2000 to date

33

Sri K. Ramana

Agril. Extn.Officer

25.4.2002 to date

34

Smt. P. Sudharani

Agril. Extn.Officer

5.3.2002 to date

35

Smt. K. Kameswara Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

8.3.2002 to date

36

Sri N. Ravikumar

Artist cum-Photographer

23.4.1987 to date

37

Sri P. Surya Rao`

Electrician

17.12.1977 to date

38

Sri V. Appa Rao

Tractor Driver

20.2.1977 to date

39

Sri P. Appa Rao

Oil Engine Driver

15.11.1977 to date

40

Sri B. Appa Rao

Oil Engine Driver

29.6.93 to date

41

Sri M. Sambasiva Rao

Driver

5.5.99 to date

42

Sri. V.Nageswara Rao

Driver

2.4.2002 to date

43

Sri B. Govinda

Driver

5.5.99 to date

44

Sri D. Tirupathi Rao

Mechanic

15.12.89 to date

45

Sri G. Babu Rao

Record Assistant

30.3.84 to date

46

Sri M. Satyanarayana

Record Assistant

21.10.96 to 30.8.01

47

Sri M.S. Prakasa Rao

Record Assistant

15.6.99 to date

48

Sri N. Nooka Raju

Record Assistant

15.6.99 to date

49

Sri K. Ramana

Record Assistant

7.7.95 to 24.4.2002

50

Sri K. Nagamaheswara Rao

Record Assistant

23.9.2000 to date

51

Sri S. Radhakrishna

Record Assistant

9.3.2002 to 30.5.2002

52

Sri K. Somidora

Attender

2.1.70 to date

53

Sri K. Byragi

Attender

17.9.77 to date

54

Smt. K. Kasulamma

Attender

8.11.85 to date

55

Smt. M. Appayamma

Attender

5.12.92 to date

56

Smt. J. Ramana

Attender

5.12.92 to date

57

Smt. K. Ramalakshmi

Attender

30.7.97 to date

58

Sri E. Ragulu

Attender

1.8.96 to date

59

Sri K. Chinna

Attender

1.8.96 to date

60

Sri G. Govinda

Attender

2.3.91 to date

61

Sri O. Ramu

AWM

3.4.85 to date

62

Sri K. Mattalu

AWM

3.4.85 to date

63

Sri K. Adinarayana

AWM

3.4.85 to date

64

Sri K. Nageswara Rao

AWM

3.4.85 to date

65

Sri G. Appa Rao

AWM

8.11.85 to date

66

Smt. M. Adiyamma

AWW

8.11.85 to date

67

Sri P. Nageswara Rao

AWM

1.4.87 to 30.6.01

68

Smt. A. Pydithalli

AWW

5.12.92 to date

69

Smt. G. Adilakshmi

AWW

1.8.96 to date

70

Sri V. Jagga Rao

AWM

1.8.96 to 5.7.01

71

Sri B. Samudralu

AWW

1.8.96 30.6.01

72

Sri J.Appalanarasa

AWW

10.7.2000 to date

73

Smt. G. Atchiyyamma

AWW

12.9.2000 to date

74

Smt. Vengala Krishna

AWW

1.5.2002 to date

75

Sri Shaik Muskin

Watchman

15.5.85 to date

76

Sri Jash Bahadhur

Watchman

1.4.81 to date

77

Sri P. Raghunadh

Watchman

23.6.83 to date

78 Sri V. Kanna Rao Watchman 4.3.91 to date
Social Status of staff members:


Social status

Prof.

Teaching Assoc. Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Non-Teaching

Class II

Class III

Class IV

M

W

M

W

M

W

M

W

M

W

M

W

OC

3

-

1

3

3

3

-

-

15

-

12

4

BC

1

-

2

-

3

1

1

-

16

2

9

4

SC

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

1

-

1

2

ST

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Christians

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Sikhs

-

-

-

-

-

-

- -

-

-

-

-

Jains

-

-

-

- -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Buddhists

- - - - -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Any other monition
Deputations: Nil

Publications from Research Station and list of scientific papers contributed :

Agronomy:

Bharatha Laxmi M and T. Chitkala Devi (2002) cultural management of weeds in Sugarcane: Presented in symposium on low cost production technology to meet global challenges organised by Society of Agronomy, ANGRAU, Coimbatore from October 31st November 6th 2001.

Plant Pathology
Nageswara Rao. G.V. and Achuta Rama Rao. M (2001), Screening of Sugarcane varieties / genotypes for resistance to red rot disease caused by Physalospora tucumanensis speg: SISTA sugar journal 26: 77-78.

Nageswara Rao. G.V. and Achuta Rama Rao. M (2001) occurrence of a new virulent pathotype of collectochum falcatun on sugarcane in Andhra Pradesh: Journal of Mycology and Plant Pathology (submitted for publication).

Achuta Rama Rao. M and Nageswara Rao G.V. (2001) Bio control of caratocystis paradoxa the incitant of pineapple disease of Sugarcane: Journal of Mycology and Plant Pathology (Submitted for publication).

Nageswara Rao G.V., Rajaram Reddy. D and Prasada Rao. R.D.V.J 2002: Identification of sources of resistance to leaf crinckle disease in blackgram 2002 proceedings of the National Seminar Resources management during 21st century held on 14th and 15th November 2002.
Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry
Jamuna .P, Ramalinga Swamy. K: Naidu N.V and Subrahmanyam. K. Effect of application of certain organic manures on soil fertility and crop productivity of Sugarcane Presented the research paper in the 2nd international conference on sustainable agricuture Water resource development and earth care policies on 18-20 December, 2002 at New Delhi.

Jamuna. P, Ramalinga Swamy .K and Naidu N.V. Efficiency of biofertilizers in Sugarcane Published in Biofertilizers letter Vol. 10, No. 2 December, 2002.

Nageswara Rao. G.V, Rajaram Reddy. D and Prasada Rao. RDVJ (2002): Integrated management of blackgram leaf crinckle disease. Proceedings of the National Seminar resources management during 21st century held on 14th and 15th November, 2002 Page No: 127.

Goh K.M and Jamuna Pamidi, 2003 plant sulphur uptake as related to changes in HI reducible and total sulphur fractions in soil Published in plant soil Vol 250. Page 1-13.
Guest lectures delivered: Nil
Radio Programmes:
  1. Cheraku nundi Adhika Panchadara, Beellam sadhinchadamki nariketappudu teesukovalasina jagrathalu (11.1.2002)
  2. Cheruku sagulo yeruvulu, neeti yajamanyam (4.3.2002)
  3. Varshadharapu verusenaga Yajamanya paddatulu (5.6.2001)
  4. Cherukulo kalupu nivarana charyalu (18.2.2002)
  5. Cherukulo adhika digubadiki aacharincha valasina anatakrushi paddathulu (12.6.02)
  6. Rytu sthayiso vithanothpathi Suchanalu
  7. Adhunika vyavasayam pi vathavarasa sastra prabhavam (20.9.02)
  8. Vesavilo kuragayala sagu (3.4.02)
  9. Uttarakostha Jillaku anuvina sampradeyetara pantalu yajamanya padhatulu (31.12.02).
Receipts (Value in rupees)

1. Sale of seed

:

-

a) Foundation seed supplied to APSSDC and Department of -Agriculture and farmers

:

90,590-00

b) Breeder seed supplied to APSSDE

:

-

c) Breeder and foundation seed sold to farmers

:

-

d) Foundation seed on F.T. bill

:

1578-00

e) Breeder seed on F.T. bill

:

-

2. Sale of Non-seed to staff and casual mazdoors

:

20,369-00

3. Sale of green grass

:

59,900-00

4. Sale of Paddy straw

:

-

5. Sale of any other items (Specify items)

:

-

Sale of usufructs, auction of trees

:

78,865-00

Cane supplied to factories

:

1,16,015-00

Sale of jaggery

:

24,679-00

Sale of plant material

:

3,242-00

Sale of other items

:

1,99,145-00

Total

Rs. 5,34,483-90

-
RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

Crop Improvement: (Plant Breeding)

  • In main yield trial (mid-late) I plant the clones 97 A 78 (110.55 t/ha), 94 A 21 (99.74 t/ha), 96 A 209 (98.44 t/ha) cane yield than check Co 7219 (83.07 t/ha). The clone 97 A 62 with 19.65% juice sucrose was on par with check Co 7219 (19.98%) while 96 A 136 (12.70 t/ha) and 96 A 209 (11.62 t/ha) recorded higher CCS yield and Jaggery yield respectively.
  • In advanced varietal trial (early) I plant crop, the clone 92 A 355 registered significantly higher cane yield (128.50 t/ha), sugar yield (14.65 t/ha) and Jaggery yield (13.0 t/ha) compared to standards Co 6907 (9.05, 9.97 and 10.01 t/ha) and Co 7508 (102.26, 12.84 and 11.71 t/ha). The clones 91 V 83 (133.2 t/ha, 15.5 t/ha and 15.1 t/ha) and Co C 970661 (122.6 t/ha, 14.3 t/ha and 13.85 t/ha) recorded significantly higher cane, sugar and jaggery yields respectively compared to standards Co 7508 (103.6 t/ha, 12.5 t/ha and 11.9 t/ha) and Co 6907 (99.7 t/ha, 9.9 t/ha and 10.6 t/ha) in advanced varietal trial (early) II plant. In ratoon crop of the same trial among the test clones Co C 97061 (87.34 t/ha, 9.90 t/ha and 9.66 t/ha) and 91 A 83 (96.15 t/ha, 11.39 t/ha and 10.72 t/ha) recorded significantly higher cane yield, sugar yield and jaggery yields respectively compared to Co 6907 (81.80 t/ha, 8.12 t/ha and 8.34 t/ha) and Co 7508 (75.23 t/ha, 9.72 t/ha and 8.142 t/ha).

Agronomy:

  • Among the herbicides tested, pre-emergence application of Metribuzin @ 1.0 kg a.i/ha as pre-emergence followed by one hand weeding at 60days after planting (86.0t/ha) or atrazine @ 2.5 kg a.i/ha as pre-emergence followed by post emergence application of Gramoxone @ 2.5 lit + Fernoxone @ 5kg/ha coupled with manual row weeding at 60DAP (83.8 t/ha) found effective in control of weeds and gave higher cane yields on par with conventional practice of hand weeding thrice at 30, 60 and 90 DAP. The unweeded control plot gave significantly lower cane yields of 70.9 t/ha.3
  • Application of NPK fertilizers to new promising early maturing sugarcane genotypes (92 A 35 and 93 A 145) at 100% recommended level significantly increased the cane yield (83.3 t/ha) over 75% recommended level of NPK fertilizers (76.5 t/ha). But further increased in the level of NPK fertilizers to 125% (85.0 t/ha) did not improved the cane yields to a significant level. Among the genotypes tested, 93 A 145 (cane yield: 89.9% t/ha, juice sucrose 17.85%) proved superior to 92 A 355 (cane yield: 73.9 t/ha), juice sucrose: 17.05%). The per cent juice sucrose values did not vary significantly due to different levels of fertilizers.
  • Planting of sugarcane at 80cm (85.1 t/ha) or in pairs at 40/120cm spacing (90.0 t/ha) recorded more or less similar cane yields and found superior to wider row spacing of 160cm (67.6 t/ha). Among the intercrops maize produced 2,083 kg/ha and greengram gave 300kg/ha. Fenugreek and Coriander failed an average yield of 1200kg/ha. Sucrose values of cane juices were not influenced either by method of planting or intercropping.
  • Application of phosphorus @ 100 kg P2O5/ha in three splits at planting, 45 and 90 DAP along with 120 kg K2O/ha applied in three splits (0, 60 and 120 DAP) gave significantly higher cane yields as compared to application of P alone or K alone applied either in single dose or split doses. No P & K applied plots registered the lowest cane yields.
  • Bulk crop of sugarcane variety 87 A 397 was grown during 2001. A cane yield of 116.6 t/ha with juice sucrose of 16.6% was obtained from the plant crop.
Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry
  • Application of N and P chemical fertilizers as per recommended dose (N112 + P2O5 100 kg/ha) significantly increased cane yields over control to an extent of 39.8%. Such an improvement in cane yields due to application of 75% RDF of N and P fertilizers was observed to be 24.8% only. However, integrated use of 75% RDF N and P fertilizers either with vermi compost @ 2t/ha or sugarcane trash compost @ 2t/ha or FYM @ 25t/ha increased cane yields (92.6, 91.7 and 93.2 t/ha, respectively) over control (64.5 t/ha) on par with those obtained with 100% RDF N and P fertilizers (90.2 t/ha). The cane yields were further improved due to application of biofertilizers (Azotobacter @ 5kg/ha and phosphobacteria @ 8kg/ha) along with integrated use of 75% RDF N and P fertilizers and organic manures (FYM / Vermicompost / sugarcane trash compost). Improvement in soil fertility was observed due to integrated nutrient management in sugarcane.
  • A progressive increase in cane and sugar yields was recorded due to application of N, P, K fertilizers at different levels (0, 50, 75 and 100%) of recommended doses of fertilizers and the increase were further enhanced due to their integration with organic manures like FYM @ 25t/ha or pressmud cake @ 12t/ha or enriched pressmud cake @ 5 t/ha. Nutrient economy to an extent of 25% was also observed due to integrated use of 75% N, P, K fertilizers and organic manures (FYM Enriched OMC), besides improving soil fertility.
  • The experimental results showed that application of major nutrients (N112 + P2O5 100 + K2O 120 kg/ha) + micro nutrients sprays (FeSO4 @ 0.5% or ZnSO4 @ 0.2% or MnSO4 @ 0.25%) twice at 45 and 60 days after planting increased cane yields by 4.1, 3.5 and 2.6t/ha, respectively over application of major nutrients (N112 + P2O5 + K2O kg/ha) + micro nutrients FeSO4 @ 0.5% or ZnSO4 @ 0.25%) twice at 45 and 60 days after planting increased cane yields by 4.1, 3.5 and 2.6 t/ha sugarcane, variety 85 A 26%. Such response was not observed with other micronutrients (Copper, boron and molybdenum) application.
  • Application of cane trash mulch @ 3 t/ha significantly increased mean cane yields (50.9 t/ha) over no mulching (45.5 t/ha) in rainfed sugarcane, variety 85 A 26%. Maximum improvement in cane yields over control (38.9 t/ha) was observed due to integrated use of cane trash mulching + 100% RDF of N and P fertilizers (mean cane yield of 57.8t/ha) when compared to improvement observed with 100% RDF N and P fertilizers alone (mean cane yield of 52.0 t/ha). Similar trend of results were observed in respect of sugar yield.

AICRP on Processing, Handling and Storage of Jaggery & Khandasari:

  • In Advanced Varietal Trial (Early) Ratoon crop in the sucrose and total non sugar content of genotypes ranged from 83.5 87.8% & 5.8 12.7% where as in standards they ranged from 78.4 86.6% & 6.0 9.6%. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 66.76 85.42 t/ha and 6.52 8.26 t/ha respectively. Among four genotypes Co A 95081 and Co A 96081 were found to due to higher cane and jaggery yields (85.42 & 81.77 t/ha and 8.67 & 8.26 t/ha). The results revealed that in Advanced Varietal Trial (Early) I Plant crop sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 80.3 86.8% & 8.0 16.0% whereas in standards they ranged from 82.3 83.0% & 6.2 8.3%.
  • The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 100.96 125.52 t/ha and 10.29 12.49 t/ha respectively. The results revealed that in Advanced Varietal Trial (Early) II Plant crop the sucrose and total non sugar content of genotypes ranged from 78.7 83.7% & 6.9 15.1% where as in standards they ranged from 82.9 83.5 and 5.8 7.8%. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 97.22 119.36 t/ha and 10.01 12.23 t/ha respectively.
  • In Main Yield Trial (Early) Ratoon series I the sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 79.2 85.1% and 6.9 to 15.4% compared to standard 82.4% sucrose and 6.5% total non-sugar. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 53.47 92.10 t/ha and 5.72 9.41 t/ha respectively. Among the six genotypes 93 A 145 recorded 82.1% sucrose with higher cane and jaggery yields 92.10 t/ha and 8.20 t/ha respectively.
  • In Main Yield Trial (Early) Series II the sucrose and total non sugar content of genotypes ranged from 76.8 88.7% and 5.2 17.1 where as in standard sucrose (85.9%) and total non sugar content was 6.4%. the cane and jaggery yields ranged from 65.88 91.15 t/ha and 5.20 7.15 t/ha respectively.
  • In Main Yield Trial (Early) Series III the sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 76.8 88.4% & 3.4 16.1% where as in standard 87.5% (Sucrose) and 6.6% (total non sugar) was recorded. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 77.50 96.10 t/ha and 5.82 10.05 t/ha respectively.
  • In Preliminary Yield Trial the sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 80.6 87.8% & 7.5 13.4%.
  • In Advanced Varietal Trial (Mid-late) plant crop the sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 80.4 85.6% & 5.7 15.4% where as in standards they ranged from 83.9 84.6% & 7.0 9.1 %. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 93.59 114.49 t/ha and 8.89 11.78 t/ha respectively. In main yield trail (mid late) ratoon, the sucrose and total non sugar content of genotypes ranged from 83.5 88.3 % 3.2 10.4 % when compared to standard 87.0 % sucrose and 5.6 % total non sugar. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 62.61 98.50 t/ha and 5.22 9.85 t/ha respectively. In advanced varietal trail (mid late) ratoon the sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 80.4 83.5% and 5.7 12.2 % and in standards it ranged from 81.2 85.6 % & 6.6 8.4 %. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 73.92 84.10 t/ha and 6.51 8.49 t/ha respectively. In main yield trail (mid late) II plant crop the sucrose and total non-sugar content of genotypes ranged from 80.4 88.1 % and 5.4 11.2 % where as in standard sucrose content was 87.0 % and total non-sugar content was 9.2 %. The cane and jaggery yields ranged from 79.8 114.94f t/ha respectively.
  • The effect of keeping quality and stacking strength on jaggery limps from immature, mature and overaged cane when kept in cold storage revealed that in the jaggery limps from immature cane when stored from February, 2001 to February, 2002 shows high reduction in sucrose content and increase in total non sugar content when compared to jaggery limps from mature cane (March to February, 2002) and overaged cane (May to February, 2002). All the jaggery lumps maintained good hardness with out change in taste and weight.
  • The effect of number of limps kept in piles of 55,6,7 & 8 revealed that there was no effect on quality of limps with respect to piles of 5,6 and 7 where as in the limps kept n piles of 8 limps, the lower lumps recorded breakage in immature and overaged cane jaggery.
  • Jaggery prepared form problematic soils like saline soils, alkali soils and saline alkali soils recorded inferior quality as reflected in low sucrose, high reducing sugar and total non sugars followed by dark colour and softness due to presence of high salt content compared to jaggery from normal soils.

Plant Physiology:

  • During the year 2001 2002 fifteen sugarcane clones were studied under late planted rainfed conditions for their performance. Among the clones 93 A 53 recorded higher total dry
  • matter per plant, leaf area, cane diameter but recorded a cane yield of 35.9 t/ha because of low shoot population. 89 V 74 registered higher cane yield of 41.1 t/ha with more shoot population and length of millable cane. The clones 85 A 261, 93 A 21, 89 V 74, 93 A 178, 96 A 202, 93 A 145 and 93 A 53 recorded higher plant height compared to other tested clones.
  • Under water logged conditions (2 2.5 ft) for a period of 102 days (September December), the clones 93 A 145, 92 A 202, 96 A 218, 93 A 134 and 93 A 21 recorded higher cane yield and juice sucrose compared to standard variety Co A 7602.
  • Fifteen varieties of groundnut were studied for their performance during Kharif 2001 and Rabi 2001 2002. The varieties TCGS 320, ICGS 65, K 1271, K 1228, K 1317, K 134 recorded higher yields. Number of ill filled pods per plant were more in Kharif compared to Rabi season while shelling percent was more in Rabi over Kharif and was reflected in the performance of varieties for yield.
  • Sucrose content increased with increase in dry matter showed the dominant effect of biomass accumulation in determining stalk sucrose accumulation.
Entomology:
  • In main yield trial, cumulative incidence of early shoot borer was in the range of 12.26% in 97 A 78 to 25.12% in 99 A 44. However, the differences were not significant. Intensity of inter node borer varied from 2.85% in 97 A 62 to 7.38% in 97 A 44. Genotype 97 A 62 recorded significantly less intensity of inter node borer (2.85%) compared to Co 7219 (5.28%). Genotypes to Co 6907 (7.03%) and 97 A 44 (7.78%) have recorded significantly more intensity of inter node borer than Co 7219. intensity of scale insect ranged from 2.32% in 97 A 22 to 26.13% in Co 6304. the differences were not significant. Genotype 97 A 85 registered significantly more cane yield (122.5 t/ha) than Co 7219 (82.92 t/ha). Weight of scale incrustation ranged from 4mg/cane in 97 A 78 to 691 mg/cane in Co 6304. The differences were not significant. Per cent juice sucrose varied from 13.23 in Co 7219 to 17.84 in 97 A 62. Genotypes 97 A 64 (15.65%), 97 A 22 (16.14%), Co 6907 (16.32%) and 97 A 62 (17.84%) have registered significantly more per cent sucrose than Co 7219 (13.23%).
  • In a demonstration on integrated pest management of sugarcane, IPM practice dipping setts in 0.1% malathion solution for 15 minutes before planting and trash mulching @ 3 t/ha on 6th day after planting has recorded least incidence of early shoot borer followed by lindane application at 4 kg each at 0, 30 days after planting (6.58% DH). The untreated control recorded 0.08% DH cumulative application of lindane treatment. IPM practice i.e., trashing in first weeks of July, August and September months followed by need based spraying with malathion has recorded less intensity of scale insect (1.78%) and weight of scale incrustation (125 mg/cane) compared to untreated control (4.03%; 223 mg/cane).
  • Regular collection of different stages of the pests was made at 15 and 50days intervals and prevalence of natural enemies on these was recorded. Prevalence of Trichogramma chilonis and Hippasasa lycosina and early shoot borer eggs and Isotima favensls, Cotesla flavipes, Bracon hebetor on early shoot borer larvae during March to May were recorded. Occurrence of certain predatory spiders like Crublona drassodes and Scytodes fusca were observed to be the most potential parasite on eggs of sugarcane leaf hopper during July to September devouring at least 3 egg masses per each predator.
  • Mass multiplication of host insect, Corcyna cepkalonica and multiplication of Trichogramma chilonis, Racon hebetor are under progress in IPM laboratory. Cumulative incidence of early shoot borer were 4.44% in Trichogramma chilonis released plot and 15.74% in control plot. Intensity of internode borer was 3.9% in Trichogramma chilonis released plot and 9.62% in control plot. Per cent sucrose was 17.66% in Trichogramma chilonis released plot whereas it was 15.34% in control plot. Cane yield was 81.20 t/ha in Trichogramma chilonis released plot and in control plot it was 65.5% t/ha.
  • In biological control experiments, the intensity of brinjal shoot and fruit borer was 3.55% in bio-agents released plots and 12.4% in control plot in Kharif season whereas the intensity was 6.46% in bio-agent released plot compared to 17.02% incidence in control plot in Rabi season. The intensity of bhendi shoot and fruit borer is less (2.38% in Kharif and 6.38% in Rabi) in bio-agents released plot compared to 10.37% incidence in Kharif and 25.44% incidence in Rabi in control plot. The intensity of groundnut leaf miner was less i.e., 1.70% in Trichogramma chilonis released plots compared to control plot (18.12%) during Kharif and it was 4.76 and 12.52% respectively during Rabi.

Plant Pathology:

  • Out of 28 entries tested for resistance to smut, one variety (Co 7706) showed resistant reaction four entries, two entries (81 A 99 and 98 A 1163) showed from diethyl resistant reaction showed moderately susceptible reaction, 10 entries showed susceptible reaction and the remaining 11 entries showed highly susceptible reaction.
  • Out of 33 varieties / clones tested by nodal method of inoculation, 3 varieties viz., Co 419, Co C 671 and 997 were susceptible to their respective pathotype and mixture. Whereas, 97 A 64 is susceptible to Cf 671 and mixture and 97 A 78 is susceptible to all the three pathotype and mixture.
  • In plug method, out of 34 entries tested, the entries reacted as resistant to all the three pathotypes. Of these, Co 77, 85 A 261, 97 A 22, 98 A 109, 98 A 160 and 98 A 163 are commercially important.
  • The virulence pattern of five isolates (Co 419, Co C 671, Co 997, 85 A 261 and Co Si 96071) indicated the existence of four distinct redrot pathotypes (Cf 419, Cf 671, Cf 997 and Cf 261) in Coastal Andhra Pradesh.
  • Out of 58 entries tested for resistance to red rot by plug method of inoculation to a mixture of red rot pathotypes (Cf 419, Cf 671 and Cf 997) in first ratoon of selection nursery, 20 genotypes reacted as resistant, 7 genotypes as in tolerant- and the rest of 31 entries reacted as susceptible.

Other crops:

  • Twelve entries along with two checks were evaluated for late planted condition. Among long duration varieties, the promising culture i.e. RGL 5613 recorded higher grain yield (5018 kg/ha) on a unit of more number of car bearing tiller (532) and more test weight (26.0) when compared to improved check Srikakulam Sannalu (4851 kg/ha) with number of EBT (515) and test weight of 21.0 g. The promising culture i.e. RGL 9999 recorded more yield (4111 kg/ha) with less number of EBT (489) and more number of grain (120). This is no significant variation for number of grains per panicle; 1000 grain weight and days to 50% flowering.
  • Fourteen promising varieties including check. Srikakulam Sannalu were evaluated under swamp conditions at Andalapalle village of Atchutapuram mandal. The results revealed that the varieties PLA 787 (3099 kg/ha). PLA 750 (3024 kg/ha) and CN 540 (3014 kg/ha) were on par with the check, Srikakulam Sannalu (3009 kg/ha) and found significantly superior over PLA 1100, Pang, Jalamagha and Sabitha. The ear bearing tillers recorded more number in PLA 787 (258); PLA 750 (238) followed by CN 540 (223). However the promising variety CN 540 recorded more number of grains (153) with less number of car bearing tillers / m2 (223) results in lower yield when compared to PLA 787 and PLA 750.
  • Four varieties were tested for their response to different nutrient levels during Kharif 2001. Srikakulam Sannalu among along duration varieties (532 kg/ha) and RGL 8828 among medium duration varieties recorded higher yields than other varieties under study. The variety Srikakulam Sannalu registered significantly higher grain yield at 125% RDF but was on par with the grain yield at 75 % and at 100% RDF with the same variety and at 125% RDF with the variety RGL 8828, with significant lower yields was recorded in medium duration check variety i.e. Vasundhara at 75 % REF (3800 kg/ha). Interaction between varieties and nutrient levels were found significant. Irrespective of the variety, application of NPK at 100 % recommended dose resulted in significantly higher grain yield (4590 kg/ha) than 75 % RDF but on par with 25% REF. Increasing the fertilizers dose beyond recommended NPK did not improve the grain yield significantly.

Horticulture:

  • Among the tomato entries tested HYT 1 recorded significantly higher yield of 48.30 t/ha as compared to other entries. Arks sourabh recorded 42.6 t/ha and HYTH 2 recorded 39.3 t/ha. Number of fruits / plant and mean fruit weight was highest in HYT 1 and HYTH 2 respectively. Yield / plant was highest in HYT 1 (2.42 kg_ closely followed by Arka sourabh (2.02 kg).

Influence of weather on crops:

  • During July 2001, the distribution of rainfall is erratic. Due to this red mite, internode borer and scale insect have occurred on sugarcane. In other crops sucking pest complex was noticed. In rice crop severe incidence of leaf folder was observed. In orchard crops severe incidence of tea mosquito and thrips damage was noticed on cashew. In early part of 2002, severe incidence of early shoot borer was observed. Overall incidence of pests in moderately higher during 2001 2002.
Meteorological information:
S.No

Month & Year

Total rainfall (mm)

Rainy days (No.)

Mean for 10 years (1993-2002)

Total rainfall (mm)

Rainy days (No.)

1

June, 2001

131.2

11

131.5

7.2

2

July, 2001

131.2

6

143.2

9.6

3

August, 2001

151.0

13

181.1

10.5

4

September, 2001

155.4

6

218.0

9.8

5

October, 2001

230.2

12

224.7

10.1

6

November, 2001

138.4

6

041.3

2.9

7

December, 2001

002.4

0

003.2

0.4

8

January, 2002

008.8

1

008.3

1.0

9

February, 2002

000.0

0

008.9

0.6

10

March, 2002

000.0

0

011.6

0.5

11

April, 2002

031.2

2

042.7

2.6

12

May, 2002

019.4

2

077.5

3.7

-

Total

972.2

59

1092.0

58.9

2002-2003

1. Plan of the Research Station:

-

a. Name of the Research Station:

Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

b. Name of the Head of the Station:

Dr. K.Subrahmanyam
Associate Director of Research

c. Year of Establishment:

1913

d. Area in hectares:

41.74ha

1. Total area:

41.74ha

2. Dry:

9.90ha

3. Wet:

1.99ha

4. Irrigated dry:

17.45ha

5. Roads, buildings, channels:

10.77ha

6. Grazing lands or pastures:

Nil

7. Cultivated area:

29.34

8. Cultivable but not cultivated
during the year:

-

9. Land not brought under cultivation:

Nil

10. Orchard:

1.63

e. Source-wise area irrigated in the station (Season)

Source of irrigation

Area irrigated (ha)

Kharif Rabi Total

Canals

-

-

-

Open wells

-

-

-

Tube wells

1.99

17.45

19.44

Any other source

- - -

f. Expenditure Statement on the schematic operations during 2002 2003.

I. Major Head: 132 101 Non plan NCZ RARS, Anakapalle

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

8919000

8876510

42490

2

Recurring contingencies

3481000

3357370

123630

Total

12400000

12233870

166130

II. ALL INDIA CO-ORDINATED RESEARCH PROJECT ON SUGARCANE

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

1715000

1009330

705670

2

Recurring contingencies

160000

160000

-

Total

1875000

1169330

705670

III. ALL INDIA CO-ORDINATOR RESEARCH PROJECT ON PROCESSING HANDLING & STROAGE OF JAGGERY & KHANDASARI AT RARS, ANAKAPALLE
S.No-

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

-

-

-

2

Recurring contingencies

- - -

Total

-

-

-

IV. GOVERNMENT OF INDIA-STARTING OF AGRO METEROLOGICAL ADVISORY SERVICES AT RARS, ANAKAPALLE

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

146900

145670

1230

2

Recurring contingencies

31000

24860

6140

3

Telephone expenses

6000

5626

374

Total

183900

176156

7744

ECF SCHEME

S.No

Sub-Head

Budget Allocation

Expenditure incurred

Balance

1

Pay & Allowances

-

- -

2

Recurring contingencies

- - -
Total
g) Particulars of schemes operating in the stations including extension schemes �����like E.E.U. for 2000-2001.
ii) Non plan Scheme & Coordinated Projects.
(Separately for each functioning in the Station)


S. No.

Name of the post

Non plan

AICRP ON SUGARCANE

AICRP ON JAGGERY

DST

S

V

S

V

S

V

S

V

1.

Associate Director of Research

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.

Principal Scientist(s)

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.

Senior Scientist

7

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

4.

Scientist

16

4

3

-

1

-

1

-

5.

Agricultural officer

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-



Name of the Scheme: Non-Plan, Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

S.No

Name of the post

No. of posts Sanctioned

Vacant

1.

Admn. Cum- Accounts Officer

1

-

2.

Office Superintendent

1

-

3.

U.D. Steno (Senior Assistant working against this post)

1

1

4.

Senior Assistant

5

-

5.

Jr.Asst. Cum-Typist

7

2

6.

Agril. Extension Officer

10

1

7.

Artist cum-photographer

1

-

8.

Electrician

1

-

9.

Drivers

3

-

10.

Tractor Drivers

2

-

11.

Oil Engine Drivers

2

-

12.

Mechanic

1

1

13.

Record Assistant

9

4

14.

Attender

7

1

15.

Agril. Workman

14

2

16.

Watchman

4

1

17

Sweeper cum Scavenger

1

1



Name of the Scheme: Non-Plan (VZM)

1.

Senior Assistant

1

-

2.

Jr. Asst. Cum-Assistant

1

1

3.

Agril. Extension Officer

2

-

4.

Attender

1

-

Non-Plan (Peddapuram) posts shifted from Peddapuram under NARP

1.

Agril. Extension Officer

1

-

2.

Attender

1

-

PHT AICRP (ICAR) (GUR Scheme)

1.

Agril. Extension Officers

2

1

2.

Mechanic

1

-

3.

Attender

1

-

ECF Scheme

1.

Agril Extension Officer

6

2

2.

Jr.Asst.Cum Typist

1

-

3. Watchman 1 1
Number of Staff Quarters :21


Teaching

Non-Teaching

Vacant

Occupied

Vacant

Occupied

- 15 - 6


Particulars of incumbents in the station / scheme
Name of the scheme / station Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

Sl.No

Name

Designation

Period

1.

Dr. Rosaiah

Associate Director of Research

13.6.2002 to till to date

2.

Dr.N.V.Naidu

Principal Scientist (Sugarcane)

4.10.2001 to till to date

3.

Dr.V.Raja Rajeswari

Senior Scientist (Plant Physiology)

30.4.1998 to till to date

4.

Dr.M.Bharatha Lakshmi

Senior Scientist (Agronomy)

30.7.1999 to till to date

5.

Dr.N.Venugopala Rao

Senior Scientist (Entomology)

20.4.2000 to till to date

6.

Vacant

Scientist (Plant Pathology)

.2.2001 to till to date

7.

Dr. K. Srilakshmi

Senior Scientist (Agril. Economics)

30.4.2003 to till to date

8.

Vacant

Senior Scientist (Agril. Extension)

1.7.1998 to till date

9.

Dr.N.V.Naidu

Senior Scientist (Breeding)

23.4.1994 to 3.10.2001

Vacant

- do -

4.10.2001 to till to date

10.

Dr.K.Ramalinga Swamy,
Principal Scientist (Soil Science) & Vice Principal

Two Scientists (Soil Science)

5.10.1995 to till to date

11.

Dr.S.Rama Krishna Rao,
Principal Scientist (Soil Science)

Senior Research Officer

3.12.1990 to till to date

12.

Sri.T.K.V.V.Mallikarjuna Rao

Scientist (Statistics)

27.4.1985 to till to date

13.

Dr.G.V.Nageswara Rao

Senior Scientist (Plant Pathology)

12.5.1997 to till to date

14.

Vacant

Scientist (Breeding)

1.7.2002 to till to date

15.

Dr.V.Rajabapa Rao

- do -

17.5.1997 to till to date

16.

Dr.K.Subash Chandra Bose

Scientist (Plant Physiology)

20.8.1998 to till to date

17.

Dr.P.Jamuna

Senior Scientist (Soil Science)

27.5.1990 to till to date1

18.

SmtT.Chitkala Devi

Scientist (Agronomy)

29.3.2001 to till to date

19.

Smt T.Suseela

Scientist (Horticulture)

25.6.1998 to till to date

20.

Smt V.Satya Priya Lalitha

Scientist (Breeding)

30.9.1998 to till to date

21.

Smt M.Charumathi

Scientist (Breeding)

20.10.1998 to till to date

22.

Dr.Ch.V.Narasimha Rao

Scientist (Entomology)

24.11.1998 to till to date

23.

Smt B.Bhavani

- do -

30.10.2001 to till to date

24.

Dr.T.S.S.K.Patro

Scientist (Plant Pathology)

21.1.2002 to till to date

25.

Vacant

Scientist (Breeding)

5.4.1996 to till to date

26.

Vacant

Scientist (Agronomy)

1.2.1996 to till to date

27.

Sri P.V.K.Jagannadha Rao

Scientist (Agril. Engineering)

14.3.2002 to till to date

28.

Dr. K. Subrahmanyam

Scientist (Plant Pathology)

8.2.2002 to 12.6.2002

29.

Vacant

Scientist (Agronomy)

4.8.1999 to till to date

30.

Vacant

Senior Scientist (Breeding)

21.7.1998 to till to date

31.

Sri A.Upendra Rao

Scientist (Agronomy)

9.1.2002 to till to date

32.

Vacant

Agricultural Officer

13.7.2000 to till to date




NON -TEACHING PERSONNEL IN OCCUPATION FROM JUNE, 2002 TO MAY, 2003
S.No

Name

Designation

Period

1

Sri M. V. Ramanaiah

Admn. Cum-Accts. Officer

18.10.2000 to date

2

Sri D. Suri Babu

Superintendent

10.6.1999 to 30.6.2002

3

Sri P. Umamaheswara Rao

Sr. Asst. (Against U.D. Steno) i/c

13.10.1995 to date

4

Sri N. Vijaya Lakshmi

Senior Assistant

7.10.2002 to date

5

Sri P. Venkata Rao

Senior Assistant

20.9.2001 to date

6

Sri K. J. Prasad

Senior Assistant

13.10.1995 to date

7

Smt. D. Neela

Senior Assistant

22.05.1996 to date

8

Sri G. Rajakumar

Senior Assistant

9.8.1996 to 30.8.2002

9

Smt. S. Umadevi

Senior Assistant

22.7.99 to date

10

Sri RRG. Atchuta Rao

Senior Assistant

16.8.2000 to date

11

Sri KVS Satyanarayana

Senior Assistant

10.8.1998 to date

12

Sri D. Jaggappa Rao

JACT

1.10.1997 to 2.1.2002

13

Sri Md. A. Mohiddin

JACT

25.1.2002 to date

14

Sri T. Govinda Rao

JACT

30.1.02 to date

15

Sri Ch.Sreenivasa Rao

JACT

8.5.02 to date

16

Sri G. Simhachalam

JACT

21.2.2002 to date

17

Sri K. Nooka Raju

Agril. Extn.Officer

18.2.1992 to date

18

Sri B. Pydaiah

Agril. Extn.Officer

16.9.90 to date

19

Sri K. Joga Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

5.12.98 to date

20

Sri R. Appa Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

10.2.02 to 30.6.2002

21

Sri M.V.N.M. Sarma

Agril. Extn.Officer

5.11.2000 to date

22

Sri B. Satyanarayana

Agril. Extn.Officer

8.12.98 to date

23

Sri T. Jayachandra Naidu

Agril. Extn. Officer

20.6.2002 to date

24

Sri V. Rama Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

5.12.98 to date

25

Sri M. Satyanarayana

Agril. Extn.Officer

4.9.2002 to date

26

Sri P. Jagan Mohan Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

16.9.89 to date

27

Sri K. Trimurthulu

Agril. Extn.Officer

10.12.98 to date

28

Sri G. Bheemeswara Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

21.3.2002 to date

29

Sri K.V.V.Gopala Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

4.11.2000 to date

30

Sri M.Gangadhara Sarma

Agril. Extn.Officer

21.12.2000 to date

31

Sri K. Ramana

Agril. Extn.Officer

25.4.2002 to date

32

Smt. P. Sudharani

Agril. Extn.Officer

5.3.2002 to date

33

Smt. K. Kameswara Rao

Agril. Extn.Officer

8.3.2002 to date

34

Smt. K. Harathi

Agril. Extn. Officer

3.6.2002 to date

35

Sri N. Ravikumar

Artist cum-Photographer

23.4.1987 to date

36

Sri P. Surya Rao`

Electrician

17.12.1977 to date

37

Sri V. Appa Rao

Tractor Driver

20.2.1977 to date

38

Sri P. Appa Rao

Oil Engine Driver

15.11.1977 to date

39

Sri B. Appa Rao

Oil Engine Driver

29.6.93 to date

40

Sri M. Sambasiva Rao

Driver

5.5.99 to date

41

Sri. V.Nageswara Rao

Driver

2.4.2002 to date

42

Sri B. Govinda

Driver

5.5.99 to date

43

Sri G.C. Laluswamy

Driver

20.6.2003 to 28.2.2003

44

Sri B. Subrahmanyam

Driver

8.3.2003 to date

45

Sri D. Tirupathi Rao

Mechanic

15.12.89 to date

46

Sri G. Babu Rao

Record Assistant

30.3.84 to date

47

Sri M.S. Prakasa Rao

Record Assistant

15.6.99 to date

48

Sri N. Nooka Raju

Record Assistant

15.6.99 to date

49

Sri K. Nagamaheswara Rao

Record Assistant

23.9.2000 to date

50

Sri Ch. Satyanarayana

Record Assitant

1.6.2002 to date

51

Sri K. Somidora

Attender

2.1.70 to date

52

Sri K. Byragi

Attender

17.9.77 to date

53

Smt. K. Kasulamma

Attender

8.11.85 to date

54

Smt. M. Appayamma

Attender

5.12.92 to date

55

Smt. J. Ramana

Attender

5.12.92 to date

56

Smt. K. Ramalakshmi

Attender

30.7.97 to date

57

Sri E. Ragulu

Attender

1.8.96 to date

58

Sri K. Chinna

Attender

1.8.96 to date

59

Sri G. Govinda

Attender

2.3.91 to date

60

Sri O. Ramu

AWM

3.4.85 to date

61

Sri K. Mattalu

AWM

3.4.85 to date

62

Sri K. Adinarayana

AWM

3.4.85 to date

63

Sri K. Nageswara Rao

AWM

3.4.85 to date

64

Sri G. Appa Rao

AWM

8.11.85 to date

65

Smt. M. Adiyamma

AWW

8.11.85 to date

66

Smt. A. Pydithalli

AWW

5.12.92 to date

67

Smt. G. Adilakshmi

AWW

1.8.96 to date

68

Sri J.Appalanarasa

AWW

10.7.2000 to date

69

Smt. G. Atchiyyamma

AWW

12.9.2000 to date

70

Smt. Vengala Krishna

AWW

1.5.2002 to date

71

Smt. K. Ramaiah

AWM

17.4.2003 to date

72

Sri Shaik Muskin

Watchman

15.5.85 to date

73

Sri Jash Bahadhur

Watchman

1.4.81 to date

74

Sri P. Raghunadh

Watchman

23.6.83 to date

75

Sri V. Kanna Rao

Watchman

4.3.91 to date

List of publications:

Agronomy:
  1. Bharatha Lakshmi.M and T.Chitkala Devi. Integrated Weed Management in sugarcane 2002. proceedings of symposium on low cost production technologies to meet global changes.P: 76-80
  2. Chitkala Devi.T and Bharatha Lakshmi.M Agro-Techniques for increasing productivity in sugarcane 2002. proceedings of Research and Development workers meet of sugarcane held at Tanuku from 25th 26th October. P:
  3. Bharatha Lakshmi.M and Chitakala Devi.T Irrigation management in sugarcane,2002. paper presented at 20th meeting of Sugarcane Research and Development workers held at Tanuku from 26th to 28th October 2002. P:
  4. Bharatha Lakshmi.M, Chitkala Devi.T and Narasimha Rao.I.V, 2003. Effect of time of nitrogen application on yield and quality of early maturing sugarcane varieties under rainfed conditions. Sugar Tech. 51(1X2): 73-76.

AICRP on Processing, Handling and Storage of Jaggery & Khandsari:
Informative and Popular articles:

  1. S. Ramakrishna Rao and R.S.L.K.M. Prasad, 2002. Problems in jaggery making Steps to be taken for increasing quality, Annadata Monthly Agricultural Magazine, Feb 2002.
  2. S. Ramakrishna Rao and R.S.L.K.M. Prasad, 2002. What to do for increasing quality of jaggery. Mana Rythuvani Monthly Agricultural Magazine, March 2002.
  3. Advantages with jaggery making daily News paper, Vartha, 20th January 2002.
  4. S. Ramakrishna Rao and R.S.L.K.M. Prasad, 2002.� Steps to be taken for quality jaggery making Annadata Monthly Agricultural Magazine, May 2002.
  5. S. Ramakrishna Rao Inview of WTO New methods in quality jaggery making for storage and export published Annadata Monthly, January 2003.
  6. S. Ramakrishna Rao Quality Jaggery Making Under Drought Condition was published in Annadata, Monthly in February 2003.

Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry:

  1. Integrated Nutrient Management in Sugarcane by P. Jamuna1 and K. Ramalinga Swamy2, Regional Agricultural Research Station, presented the paper at 20th R & D Meeting of Sugarcane conducted by SBI, Coimbatore during 25 26, October 2002.
  2. Integrated use of inorganic and biofertilizers on yield and quality of sugarcane by���� K. Ramalinga Swamy1 and P. Jamuna2, Regional Agricultural Research Station, presented the paper at 20th R & D Meeting of sugarcane conducted by SBI, Coimbatore during 25 26, October 2002.
  3. Effect of mulching and integrated nutrient management in Rainfed sugarcane by������ P. Jamuna1, K. Ramalinga Swamy2, N.V. Naidu3 and K. Subrahmanyam4; Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle presented the paper at 65th Annual convention of STAI conducted on 22 24, August 2003 at Bhubaneswar.
  4. National Resources of Coastal Region in Andhra Pradesh. by K. Ramalinga Swamy1, P. Jamuna2 and M. Seshagiri Rao3; Acharya N.G.Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad 30. Paper included in the Book published on Natural Resources of Coastal regions of India published by Dr. S. Natarajan et. al., (June 2002), TNAU, Coimbatore.

Plant Physiology:

  1. V. Raja Rajeswari and K. Subash Chandra Bose 2002. Management of moisture stress in sugarcane presented in the 20th Meeting of sugarcane research and development workers of Andhra Pradesh from 25th to 26th held at the Andhra Sugars Ltd., Tanuku. 99. pp: 14 15.
  2. K. Subash Chandra Bose and V. Raja Rajeswari, 2002. Management of waterlogged conditions in sugarcane presented in the 20th meeting of sugarcane research and development workers of Andhra Pradesh from 25th to 26th held at the Andhra Sugars Ltd., Tanuku. pp: 15 16.

Entomology:

  1. Narasimha Rao Ch.V., Narasimha Rao B. and Ramesh Babu T. 2002. Feeding response of Cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne Fabricius (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) on different types and varieties (grades) of tobacco. Journal of Entomological Research 26 (1): 16.
  2. Narasimha Rao Ch.V., Narasimha Rao B. and Ramesh Babu T. 2002. New record of predation on the eggs of Cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne Fabricius (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), a stored tobacco pest. Journal of Biological Control. 16 (2): 169 170.
  3. Narasimha Rao Ch.V., Narasimha Rao B. and Ramesh Babu T. 2003. Biology of Cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne Fabricius (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). Entomon 28 (1): 1 6 (In press).
  4. Narasimha Rao Ch.V., 2003. Prediction formulae for developmental stages of Cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne Fabricius (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), a stored tobacco pest. A paper presented in National Symposium on Tobacco organised by CTRI, Rajahmundry at Guntur on 23rd 25th of January 2003. Published in the Abstract. pp: 100.

Plant Pathology:

  1. Nageswara Rao G.V., Rajaram Reddy. D. and Prasada Rao .R.D.V.J. 2002. Host range rouge studies of leaf crinckle virus occurring in Andhra Pradesh. Sent for publication in Indian Journal of Plant Protection.
  2. Nageswara Rao G.V., Rajaram Reddy. Natural occurrence of leaf crinkle disease on blackgram in North Coastal districts of Andhra Pradesh. Journal of Research, Acharya N.G.Ranga Agricultural University (Submitted for publication)
  3. Nageswara Rao, G.V., and Rajaram Reddy. D. Effect of age of blackgram plants on susceptibility to leaf crinckle disease and its effect on yield and yield parameters. Journal of Research, Acharya N.G.Ranga Agricultural University (Submitted for publication).
  4. Patro, T.S.S.K. Evaluation of biocontrol potential of phylloplane bacteria against bacterial leaf spot of mungbean. Indian phytopathology (Submitted for publication)
  5. Patro, T.S.S.K., Bahadur, P. and Jindal, J.K. 2002. Exploitation of antagonistic phylloplane bacteria for the management of bacterial leaf spot of mungbean. Tropical Agricultural
    Research. 14: 82 90.

Receipts (Value in Rs.)

1. Sale of seed:

a) Foundation seed supplied to APSSDC and Dept. of Agriculture
and farmers:

1,54,050-00

b) Breeder seed supplied to APSSDC:

-

c) Breeder and foundation seed supplied to farmers:

79,608-00

d) Foundation seed on F.T. bills:

50-00

e) Breeder seed on F.T.bills:

-

2. Sale of non-seed to staff and casual mazdoors:
3. Sale of greengram:���������������


4. Sale of Paddy straw�
5. Sale of any other items; specify items:
Sale of userfruits, auction of trees:
Cane supplied to factories:
Sale of Jaggery:
Sale of Plant Material:
Sale of other items:

Total:

12,041-20
43,200-00_
2,88,949-00

Nil

91,400-00
2,98,499-00
17,004-00
4,389-00
1,79,327-00
5,90,619-
8,79,568-00

Research Highlights

Agronomy:
  • The performance of new promising sugarcane genotypes viz, 92 A 355 and 93 A 145 along with a standard check was tested under different nutrient levels (75%, 100% and 125% of recommended NPK) during 2002-03 season under irrigated conditions. The results indicated that application of NPK fertilizers at 100% recommended dose significantly increased the cane and sugar yields of early maturing sugarcane genotypes over 75% recommended dose of NPK. Among the test varieties 93 A 145 proved superior to 92 A 355 in respect of cane and sugar yields.
  • Pre-emergence application of metribuzin @ 1.0kg/ha and post emergence application of 2,4-D @ 1.0 kg/ha at 60DAP coupled with hoeing at 90DAP registered maximum cane yield of 83.5t/ha which was on par with the traditional practice of hand weeding and hoeing twice at 30, 60 and 90DAP. Pre-emergence application of atrazine followed by post emergence application of 2,4-D at 60DAP was also found effective in controlling weeds and produced cane yields on par with conventional practice.
  • Early maturing genotypes viz. 92 A 355 and 93 A 145 recorded more or less similar cane yields at normal row spacing of 90cm (78.6t/ha) and double row planting of 30/120cm (76.0 t/ha) which were found significantly superior to wide row spacing of 120cm (66.5 t/ha) or 155cm (63.5 t/ha). Among the test varieties 93 A 145 (77.0 t/ha) found significantly superior to 92 A 335 (57.04 t/ha).
  • Application of NPK fertilizers at 100% recommended dose increased the cane yields significantly over lower levels of NPK (75% recommended dose) when 92 A 355 and 93 A 145 were tested under rainfed conditions against the check Co 6907. Both the early maturing genotypes performed well and recorded more or less similar cane yields, but the variety 92 A 355 registered higher sucrose content at harvest.
  • Pre released cultures RGL 5613 (4625 kg) and RGL 2332 (4832 kg/ha) performed well under late planted conditions and both the cultures proved significantly superior over RGl 2537 (3889 kg/ha) but on par with the popular variety Sonamasuri.
  • Among the fourteen rice cultures tested under swamp conditions at Andalapalli village of Munagapaka mandal. PLA 787 has performed well and produced maximum grain yield of 3396kg/ha on account of higher EBT/m2 and more no. of grains per panicle.
  • Vikas and CR 1009 maintained higher spikelet fertility and recorded similar grain yields and both proved significantly superior over other cultures when tested under saline conditions.
  • MTU 9993 performed well under rainfed conditions and registered maximum grain yield of 2871 kg/ha.
  • Significant yield reduction was observed with delay in planting from first fortnight of September (5141 kg/ha) to first fortnight of October (3689 kg/ha). Among the pre-released cultures RGL 2332 performed well with more no. of EBT/hill and longer panicles under late planted conditions and produced significantly higher grain yield. Significant reduction in grain yield due to planting with 75days old seedlings was observed irrespective of variety and time of planting.
  • The forecast prediction success was high for no rain forecast (93.8%) while it was only 30.2% for rain forecast. Quantitative verification of rain forecast indicated that forecast success was high at low range of (1-5mm) rainfall. Similarly forecast success with respect to wind speed was high when forecast was between 0-6Kmph (96%). The error structure in respect of temperature was correct upto +10c and usuable upto +20c. The usuable prediction success for maximum and minimum temperature was 92% and 93.5% respectively.
  • Studies on intercropping systems in Banana revealed that Amorphophallus produced maximum yield of 22.39 t/ha without affecting the yield of main crop. In Banana + Amorphophallus inter cropping system maximum bunch weight of 18kg and maximum yield (40.8t/ha) was recorded than other inter cropping systems
  • BPP-5 cashew variety recorded maximum plant height (270.2cm) and stem girth (23.0cm) indicating its vigorous growth than other varieties. BPP-9 recorded maximum plant spread of 266.4cm on East-West and 288.0cm on North-West direction than rest of the varieties.
  • Sindhur variety of gladiolus recorded more no. of florets (12.7) per spike followed by Meera (12.2) size of the floret is larger in Kumkum (10.4cm) followed by Tilak (9.3cm) and Meera 9.3cm.
  • Red gold variety of chrysathemum was found to produce more no. of flowers per plant and recorded maximum yield (357.8gm) than rest of the varieties evaluated. Chandrika and Keerthi were found to be early flowering.
  • Arka vikas tomato variety recorded maximum yield of 40.94 q/ha during summer season.
  • Under multilocation testing of ridge gourd hybrids NS-3 recorded maximum yield/vine (1.3kg) and maximum no. of fruits/plant.HYRGH-2 and HYRGH-5 are early in flowering than rest of the varieties.
  • Under Multilocation testing of Bottle gourd hybrids, Mahyco F1 recorded more no. of fruits per vine (7.2) and highest yield per vine (3.74 kg) and maximum yield of 234.75 q/ha followed by Namdhari F1 (170.1q/ha).
  • Coconut + Amorphophallus cropping system recorded maximum net returns of Rs.54,360/- than other inter crops.
  • LCA-334 chille variety was tested at two locations in Venkupalem and Chuchukonda villages for on farm evaluation. In both the villages it has recorded good yields with 18.12q/ha at Venkupalem and 20.70 at Chuchukonda villages. (Dry pod yield)
  • Growth of groundnut was good in crop-sown during June 1st week and favoured production of more no. of filled pods/plant and resulted in higher yield. Growth attributes were not much affected due to delay in sowing upto 25th June where as growth and yield of groundnut were drastically affected in August sown crop. Incidence of pests like leaf miner and sucking pests was higher in late sown crop
  • Higher fruit set% of 18.5 was recorded in Panakalu, which had early flower bud initiation and prolonged flowering period with relatively highe no. of bisexual flowers. Banaganapally variety though recorded higher no. of flowers, fruit set % was less (1.30).

Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry:

  • Application of N and P chemical fertilizers as per recommended doses (N112 + P2O5 100kg/ha) significantly increased cane (100.2 t/ha) and sugar (12.88 t/ha) yields over control (63.3 and 7.50 t/ha or cane and sugar yields, respectively) in sugarcane variety 90 A 272. the improvement in cane yields due to 100% RDF N and P fertilizers was found to be 36.8%, while such an improvement in cane yields with 75% RDF N and P fertilizers was found to be 27.1% only. However, integrated use of 75% RDF N and P fertilizers either with vermicompost @ 2t/ha or trash compost @ 2t/ha or FYM @ 25t/ha significantly increased cane yields (98.9, 96.9 and 99.3 t/ha, respectively) over control (63.3 t/ha) on par with those obtained by 100% RDF or N and P fertilizers alone (100.2 t/ha). The cane yields were further improved due to application of biofertilizers (Azotobacter @ 5kg/ha and Phosphobacteria @ 8kg/ha) along with integrated use of 75% RDF N and P fertilizers and organic manures (FYM / Vermicompost / Trash compost), besides maintaining higher soil fertility in integrated nutrient management plots.
  • A progressive increase in cane and sugar yields was observed due to application of different levels (50, 75 and 100 % RDF) of N, P, K fertilizers with significantly higher cane (69.3 t/ha) and sugar (9.26 t/ha) yields obtained at 100% RDF N, P, K fertilizers over control (35.0 and 4.43 t/ha respectively) in sugarcane, variety 87 A 397. At each level of N, P, K fertilizer application, the cane and sugar yields were further enhanced due to their integrated use with organic manures (FYM @ 25 t/ha or pressmud cake @ 12 t/ha or Enriched PMC @ 5 t/ha) application. Nutrient economy to an extent of 25% was also observed as significant differences were not observed between 75% and 100% RDF fertilizers application, when 75% RDF fertilizers are integrated with organic manures application. Among organic manures, enriched PMC recorded higher mean cane yield (77.5 t/ha) followed by FYM (75.8 t/ha) and PMC (74.7 t/ha) applied in integration with 100% RDF N, P, K fertilizers. Post harvest soil analysis results showed higher availability of nutrients in organic manure plots (particularly soil available P2O5 in PMC and Enriched PMC plots) than in no organic manure plots.
  • In a study on sustainability of soil productivity through use of green manures in sugarcane plant ratoon system, the results of sugarcane plant crop showed that application of 100% RDF N, P, K fertilizers significantly increased cane (79.7 t/ha) and sugar (11.05 t/ha) yields over control (50.8 and 6.66 t/ha, respectively). Similar increases in cane and sugar yields were observed due to application of 75% RDF N, P, K fertilizers in integration with green manure crops (Diancha / Sunnhemp / Sesbania / Cowpea) which are grown as intercrops in between rows of sugarcane upto their flower bud stage and incorporated them into soil during interculture done for sugarcane.
  • Comparing different green manure crops, the improvement (35.8 %) in cane yields over control due to diancha was found to be higher than those obtained with other green manure crops like sunnhemp (32.7%), Sesbania (32.5%) and cowpea (33.8%).
  • The juice sucrose (%) was increased progressively with increase in times of harvest, reaching peak maturity at 11 months after harvest (coinciding in the month of February). Significantly higher juice sucrose (%) was observed in 100% RDF N, P, K fertilizers alone and also in INM plots (i.e., 75% RDF N, P, K fertilizers + green manures / FYM / composts) compared to control at any time of harvest.
  • Differences in juice sucrose (%) between 100% RDF N, P, K fertilizers and integrated use of 75% RDF N, P, K fertilizers + green manures / FYM / composts were not observed at one month before normal harvest and at normal harvest. But during later harvests (i.e., at one and two months after normal harvest), juice sucrose (%) was found to be comparatively higher in INM plots, indicating beneficial role of green manure crops / FYM / composts in maintaining juice quality, besides improving cane yields in sugarcane.
  • Application of cane trash mulch @ 3 t/ha significantly increased mean cane (41.6 t/ha) and sugar (5.98 t/ha) yields over no mulching (36.4 and 5.17 t/ha, respectively) in sugarcane, variety 85 A 261 under late (June) planted rainfed conditions. Maximum improvement (31.0%) in cane yields over control (32.3 t/ha) was observed due to integrated use of cane trash mulch + 100% RDF N and P fertilizers + Biofertilizers (Azotobacter @ 5kg/ha and Phosphobacteria @ 8 kg/ha) (cane yield 46.8 t/ha) when compared to improvement (20.2%) obtained with application of 100% RDF N and P fertilizers + Biofertilizers (Azotobacter @ 5 kg/ha and Phosphobacteria @ 8kg/ha with out mulching (cane yield 40.5 t/ha).
  • Soil samples collected in collaboration with Department of Agriculture, mandal-wise in Visakhapatnam, Vizianagaram and Srikakulam districts were analysed for their nutrient status. A total of 75, 100 and 163 soil samples were collected from the above 3 districts, respectively. The results of soil analysis showed that 82.7, 57.0 and 59.5% of samples were found to be low and 17.3, 42.0 and 40.5% samples were found to be medium in soil available nitrogen in Visakhapatnam, Vizianagaram and Srikakulam districts, respectively. High soil available nitrogen was not recorded in any of the soil samples of the three districts. Low soil available P2O5 content in 40.0, 25.0 and 36.2% samples; medium soil available P2O5 content in 22.7, 32.0 and 25.8% samples and high soil available P2O5 content in 37.3, 42.0 and 38.0 % samples were noticed in Visakhapatnam, Vizianagaram and Srikakulam districts respectively. In majority of soils of Visakhapatnam (86.7%) and Srikakulam (84.0%) districts, soil available K2O content was found to be high to very high. In Vizianagaram district, 31.0% samples are medium, 59.0% samples are high and 10.0% samples are low in soil available K2O content. The available sulphur content of soils is below the critical limit (< 10ppm S) in 13.3, 76.0 and 40.5 % samples of Visakhapatnam, Vizianagaram and Srikakulam districts, respectively.
  • The project work of NATP Land use planning for management of Agricultural Resources under Coastal Agro Ecosystem (in North Coastal Andhra Pradesh) has been taken up at two hamlet villages of Kothapolavaram and Kotharevupolavaram in Gudivada revenue village of S. Rayavaram Mandal, Visakhapatnam district. Detailed soil survey (with the help of NBSS & LUP, Bangalore) was conducted in the pilot project area (of around 300 ha); two distinct land forms (i.e., Transitional plains and marine plains) are identified; and a total of eight soil series (Series A, B, C, D and E in transitional plains and Series F, G and H in marine plains) were identified. Soil resource map with necessary soil-site characteristics was prepared. Annual rainfall characterization, seasonal distribution of rainfall, moisture availability index were assessed in the pilot site. Socio-Economic status of the farmers, soil resource constraints and other constraints related to marketability etc., were studied. The present land use facing different constraints was studied. Experiments were formulated for suggested land use to overcome some of the constraints identified in the pilot site and the work is under progress.

AICRP On processing, Handling and storage of Jaggery and Khandsari :

  • Among four genotypes studied under Advanced varietal Trial-(Early) Ratoon, Co C 97061, Co C 97062 and 91 V 83 recorded high sucrose content of 85.4 85.6% and less total non sugar content of 5.0 5.3% with bright colour, hardness and good quality jaggery compared to standard. The cane and jaggery yields of these genotypes ranged from 82.1 96.2t/ha and 8.23 10.72 t/ha respectively.
  • In advanced varietal Trial (plant crop) early series I, three genotypes viz., 92A60, 92A355 and 92V221 gave good quality jaggery with high sucrose content of 85.3 87.0% and less total non sugar content of 5.0 5.3%.- These genotypes recorded cane and jaggery yields of 112.9 128.5 t/ha and 11.90 13.05 t/ha.
  • In advanced varietal Trial (plant crop) Early Series II Co C 97061, Co C 97062, Co C 97063 and 91 V 83 recorded high sucrose content of 85.5 85.6% and less total non sugar content of 4.0-4.8% with cane and jaggery yields of 113.2 133.3 t/ha and 12.0 15.1 t/ha respectively.� Jaggery samples were found to have bright colour and hardness.
  • Among eight genotypes under Main yield Trial (Plant Crop) Early Series 97A68, 97A85, 96A146 and 96A202 gave good quality jaggery with high sucrose content (84.1 85.1%) and less total non-sugar content (4.1 5.4%) with bright colour and hardness.
  • In main yield Trial (Mid late) series, among nine genotypes studied 94A21, 96A136,96 A 209, 97A44, 97A53 and 97A78 gave good quality jaggery with recommended dose of nitrogen (112 Kg N/ha ) compared to 168 Kg N/ha) and recorded high sucrose content of 86.2 89.0% and total non sugar content of 6.2 - 9.4%- with 89.84 110.55 t/ha and 9.49 11.62 t/ha cane and jaggery yield respectively.
  • Jaggery of genotypes studied from above different trials maintained good shelf life from the period of preparation (January March) to October.
  • The effect of cold storage on keeping quality of five different grades (grade I to grade V) and five levels of initial moisture content (5-6, 6-7, 7-8, 8-9, & 9-10%) of jaggery lumps available in jaggery market was studied.- The results revealed that grade I and II with initial sucrose content of 82.5- & 80.0% total non sugar content of 6.0 & 8.7% recording bright colour and hardness had maintained good keeping quality during cold storage period March, 02 to Fevryart,03 with less changes in quality parameters compared to grade III, IV and V with initial sucrose content (72.6 77.4%) and total nonsugar content (11.7 13.6%).- However grades III, IV and V jaggery samples retained their colour and physical nature without any deterioration.
  • Regarding the effect of cold storage on jaggery with different initial moisture contents (with sucrose of 73.1 86.2% and total nonsugar content of 4.7 12.6%)- The jaggery samples with initial moisture content of 5.8% had good shelflife- with less changes in quality parameters like sucrose, total nonsugar content, colour and hardness during cold storage from March,02 to February,03.� Jaggery samples with initial moisture content ranging from 8-10% recorded wider variations in quality parameters during cold storage period.- However, the jaggery samples retained their shape and colour.
  • The data on effect of post cold storage on keeping quality (July August) of five different grades (grade I to grade V) of jaggery lumps of jaggery market revealed that grade I & II shows 2.6-2.9% reduction in colour where as grade III Grade V the percent of reduction was more in sucrose content 3.0 4.4% and increase in total nonsugar content 1.7 2.0% where as jaggery lumps of RARS- Anakapalle shows 2.4% reduction in sucrose% and 1.3% increase in total nonsugar content (presented in table 10).- The samples became soft and effected with microbial growth.
  • The data on effect of post cold storage on keeping quality (July August) of jaggery lumps of different moisture levels (5-6, 6-7, 7-8, 8-9, & 9-10%) revealed that jaggery samples of 5-6 & 6-7% moisture levels shown 1.8 2.1% reduction in sucrose % with 0.6 0.9% increase in total non sugar content where as jaggery samples of 7-8 to 9-10% moisture levels showed 2.5 4.1% reduction in sucrose content and 1.0 1.6% increase in total non sugar content.- Jaggery samples of 8-10% moisture levels became soft and dense growth of microbial organization was observed.� Remaining samples also showed moderate to high microbial colonization and samples became soft.
  • In general, jaggery prepared from problematic soils like saline soils, alkali soils and saline alkali soils recorded inferior quality as reflected in low sucrose, high reducing sugar and total non sugars followed by dark colour and softness due to presence of high salt content compared to jaggery from normal soils.
  • A 8 Kg capacity solar dryer was designed and fabricated for drying of granular jaggery.� A 100 Kg capacity bagasse based mechanical dryer was designed for drying of granular jaggery.� The fabrication of various components is being under progress.
  • A 250 Kg capacity mechanical siever for sieving of mechanical siever with direct bagging arrangement was designed-Fabrication of mechanical siever is being under progress.
  • Granular jaggery making unit will be designed using hemispherical drum fitted with cylinder of 4 length placed at 3mm gap and provided with perforations and using bearings, shafts and pullies. The unit will be operated with 2.5 HP motor.
  • The m.s. stand- of 3x4x2.5 and aluminium tray ( to keep thick sugarcane syrup) of 3x4x1 was fabricated as a part of Granular jaggery making unit-The scrapers and chain & sprocket arrangement is being done.
  • Effect of ready to use powder clarificant (vegetable) on quality and shelflife of jaggery revealed that there was an improvement in colour of jaggery with the use of ready to use power clarificant compared to jaggery prepared with lime as clarificant. There were not many differences in chemical parameters like sucrose, total nonsugars etc and shelflife.
  • Training program and demonstration of quality jaggery making in different forms viz., powder, cubes and liquid organized to 30 farmers of Andalapalle village, Visakhapatnam district on 6.5.2002 at Andalapalle in collaboration with Bhagavathula Charitable Trust, Yellamanchili.
  • Training program an demonstration of quality jaggery making technologies i.e. making of jaggery in different shapes like granular, liquid and jaggery in cubes/blocks using gur moulding frames was conducted to thirty women farmers of Venkupalem villages, Visakhapatnam district who has visited jaggery research complex on 7.3.2003.

Plant Physiology:

  • Under late planted rainfed conditions 89V74 (38.12t/ha), 92A60 (36.18t/ha), 94R21 (35.64t/ha) recorded significantly higher cane yields compared to standard Co6907 (32.65t/ha). These varieties also recorded high relative water content during formative phase. 94R21 recorded high total dry matter-per plant at 120 and 240 DAP while 92A60 recorded high percent juice sucrose.
  • The varieties 98A160, 98A165, 98A125, 93A145, 83A15, 93A134- recorded high biomass production-Sucrose content increased with increase in dry matter content during crop growth.� The pattern of stalk biomass accumulation showed similar pattern as that of stalk sucrose accumulation in determining stalk sucrose accumulation.
  • Percent brix was high in all the clones at all stages of sampling- compared to percent brix recorded immediately after harvest.- Differences among clones were significant for their capacity to retain quality for longer period after attaining peak physiological maturity in the field.� Post harvest deterioration was fast in 85A261, CoT 8201 and Co6907-The clones Co7706, Co7219, 93A145 and Co6907 were found to have relatively higher shelf life period after harvest.
  • The varieties 96A202 (81.3t/ha and 18.1%) 98A125 (77.5 t/ha and 16.8%), 87A74 (70.7t/ha and 18.3%), 97A64 (70.6t/ha and 16.7%) recorder higher cane yield and juice sucrose percent under waterlogged situations during grand growth period of the crop-These varieties also recorded more number of green leaves during water logging period.
  • Removal of water shoots in sugarcane at 240 and 270 days after planting improved the cane yield and juice quality parameters.

Groundnut :

  • Pod weight and pod yields were significantly high in sowing behind country plough over other methods of sowing- The other two methods of sowing were on par for pod weight and pod yield.� Among the varieties ICGS 65 registered significantly more number of pods and pod yield compared to other varieties tested.

Entomology:

  • In Advanced varietal trial, incidence of early shot borer at 90 and 120 days was low i.e., below 3% in all the genotypes including the standards-Cumulative incidence of early shoot borer up to 120 days ranged from 4.21% in Co7508 to 7.09% in 93 A 145.- incidence of internodes borer was below 8% in all the entries (range was 3.25% in CoC 99065 to 7.82% in- 93V 297).- Incidence of scale insect ranged from 20.95% in Co7508 to 75.01% in CoC 99065. Genotype Co7508 recorded less weight of scale incrustation (165mg/cane) compared to all other entries under test.- Highest scale incrustation of 1593mg/cane was recorded in 93 A 53.
  • In Main yield trial, cumulative incidence of early shoot borer up to 120 days was in the range of 5.65% in 98 A 122 to 8.40% in 98 A 107.- Genotype 98 A 300 recorded more than 10% internode borer intensity (11.05%) and the remaining genotypes recorded uniform intensity (below 10%) Genotype 98 A 300 recorded more intensity of scale insect (54.8%) and weight of scale incrustation was 589mg/cane in 98A45.
  • In preliminary yield trial, cumulative incidence of early shoot borer up to 120 days ranged from 21.01% in 2000 A 78 to 59.80% in 2000A241.-Incidence of internode borer- varied from 1.20% in 2000- A 240 to 12.49 in 2000 A 241.- Incidence of scale insect was in the range of 8.63% in Co 7219 to 53.69 in 2000 A 78.- Most of the entries recorded higher incidences of scale insect.- Weight of scale incrustation ranged from 95 mg/cane in 2000 A 113 to 1900 mg/cane in 2000A105.
  • The plot receiving IPM technology registered less cumulative of early shoot borer (3.13% dead hearts) than the plot receiving farmers practice (5.76% dead hearts).- Less intensity of internode borer (10.06%), scale insect (11.31%) and weight of scale incrustation (44mg/cane) were recorded in the plot receiving IPM technology compared to the plots received farmers practices (early shoot borer :5.76%; intrnode borer :12.89%; scale: 13.28; scale weight:112mg/cane).- Cost benefit ratio worked out for IPM block was 1.00:1.32.
  • In selection nursery (plant crop), cumulative incidence of early shoot borer ranged from 12.98% in 2001 A 64 to 55% in 2001 A 63.- Intensity of inter node borer varied from 1.53% in 2001 A 95 to 7.34% in 2001 A 61.- Scale incidence was in the range of 12.22% in 2001
  • A 52 to 81.39% in 2001-A 76.-Weight of scale incrustation varied from 100mg/cane in 2001 A 59 to 4050 mg/cane in 2001 A 64.
  • In selection nursery (ratoon crop), cumulative incidence of early shoot borer ranged from 21.48% in 2000 A 137 to 75% in 2000 A 166.- Intensity of internode borer was in the range of 0% in 2000 A 62 to 19.05% in 2000 A 70.- Intensity of scale insect is higher (79.96%) in 2000 A 60 and it is lower (0%) in 2000 A 59 and 2000 A 128.- Weight of scale incrustation varied from 0 mg/cane in 2000 A 59, 2000 A 128 to 656 mg/cane in 2000 A 312.
  • During 2002-2003, cumulative incidence of early shoot borer in low (7.93%) in Trichogramma chilonis released plots compared to control (16%DH). T. Chilonis released plots have recorded less intensity of internode borer (2.19%) than control plot (3.35%).
  • In field evaluation of Trichogramma chilonis for ground nut leaf miner experiment, T.Chilonis released plots have recoded low incidence of leaf miner (2.35%) compared to control plots (9.45%).
  • During Kharif,2002, in field evaluation of Bracon hebetor for the control of- bhendi shoot and fruit borer experiment, Bracon hebetor reased plot recoded low incidence of shoot and fruit borer (17.85%) compared to control plot(26.59%).- Whereas during summer, 2003, 26.67% intensity was recorded in Bracon hebetor released plot and 63.04% in control plot.
  • During Kharif,2002, in field evaluation of Bracon hebetor for the control of brinjal shoot and fruit borer experiment, less incidence of shoot and fruit borer was recoded- on fruit basis, the intensity was 26.90% in bio-agent released plot compared to 49.50% in control plot.- Whereas during Summer, 2003, 47.47% intensity was recorded in Bio-agent released plot compared to 78.90% intensity in control plot.

Plant Pathology:

  • Forty varieties/genotypes were tested for their resistances to smut under artificially inoculated conditions by soaking two budded setts in viable smut spore suspension at 1 x 106 spores /mt for 30 mints before planting.- Smut incidence was recorded at fortnightly intervals till harvest.- At each observation, affected clumps were uprooted and destroyed to avoid secondary infection.- Results indicated that only four entries (Co 7706, 81A163, 98A165) reacted as moderately resistant, eleven entries (92V206, 93V297, Co C 99065, 97A62, 97A85, 98A22, 98A125, 98A160, 99A33, 99A177) reacted as moderately susceptible, 12 entries reacted as susceptible and the remaining 13 entries reacted as highly susceptible.
  • Forty three entries included in yield trials and zonal varietal trials were evaluated for resistance to red not by nodal method and 46 entries by play method of inoculation.- The reaction of each variety was assessed by the Discriminant function value, which was derived from a Discriminant function equation in which weight age was given for characters like lesion width, white spots and modal transgression- Results revealed that out of 43 entries tested by nodal method, 34 entries reacted as resistant to all the pathotypes.- Out of-46 entries tested by plug method, 16 entries reacted as resistant to all the three pathotypes.- If these, Co 7706, Co 7508, 85A261, 92V206, Co86249, 98A109, 98A160, 98A163, 92A60, 92A355 and 92V221 are commercially important.
  • Five isolates of red rot fungus viz., Anakapalle 419, 997 Vuyyuru 671, and Nellore 85 A 261 and CoSi 96071 were tested on a set of 17 differential varieties by plug method of inoculation.- Observations on external and internal symptoms for each variety isolate combination were recorded at 60 days after inoculation and discriminate function values were calculated.-Results showed that the isolates from Co419, CoC671, Co997 and 85A261 were observed to be different isolates.-The behavior of the isolate from CoSi 96071 is similar to Cf261 in its reaction on all the differentials. Hence, it is grouped under ef261.
  • In the first ratoon of selection nursery, seventy eight entries were tested for their reaction to red rot by plug method of inoculation with a mixture of three pathotypes viz., Cf419, Cf671 and Cf997.- Results indicated that out 78 entries tested, 50 entries reacted as resistant, 7 entries reacted-as intermediate and the rest of 21 entries reacted as susceptible.

Influence of weather on crops:

  • During 2002-2003, the distribution of rainfall is erratic.- Due to this, moderate to high incidence of internode borer, was observed on sugarcane. In some pockets incidence of new pests like wooly aphid, yellow mite and mealy bug on leaves was noticed on sugarcane.-In other crops sucking pest complex was noticed.- In rice crop severe incidence of leaf folder was observed.- In orchard crops like cashew severe incidence of Tea mosquito and thrips damage was noticed- In vegetables like bhendi and brinjal severe incidence of shoot and fruit borer was observed due to high temperature and low rainfall.- During May and June months of 2003, severe incidence of Lace wing bug followed by Epilachna beetle was noticed on brinjal which was carried over to the next season crop also.- In early part of 2003, severe incidence of early shoot borer was observed.- Overall incidence of pests is somewhat higher during 2002-03 due to high temperature, low, erratic rainfall and prolonged dry spells.
Meteorological information: The weather data for the period are as follows:

Month

Temperature (0C)

R.H (%)

Rainfall
(mm)

No. of
Rainy
Days

No.of sunshine hours

Max.

Min.

At7AM

At2PM

June, 2002

34.90

26.50

85

63

144

8

6.2

July, 2002

37.1

27.1

79

50

205.2

7

6.4

August, 2002

32.0

25.5

88

67

110.8

9

3.5

September, 2002

34.3

25.4

88

58

108.6

7

5.2

October, 2002

32.6

23.5

89

62

99.8

11

6.0

November, 2002

31.3

19.6

84

44

4.6

1

6.7

December, 2002

31.7

16.6

90

43

0

0

8.7

January, 2003

30.4

16.3

93

44

4.0

1

97.9

February, 2003

32.1

19.7

95

49

0

0

8.3

March, 2003

34.0

22.5

91

49

77.2

3

8.4

April, 2003

36.9

25.6

84

49

0

0

9.5

May, 2003

38.5

27.9

82

49

3.0

0

7.8

Influence of weather on crops:

A total rainfall of 568.6mm was received during Southwest monsoon period. Though the initial was good, most of the dry crops suffered due to moisture stress during reproductive stage on account of deficit rainfall in August and September months. Rice nurseries sown in July were also dried up. Transplanting of rice could not be done due to poor filling up of tanks, wells and reservoirs. Rabi crops also could not be covered to the extent of normal area due to lack of rains during Northeast monsoon and poor availability of water in wells and tanks. Sugarcane grown under rainfed conditions suffered due to moisture stress through out the crop growth and poor recoveries were recorded. In certain areas complete drying of crop was noticed. Area under sugarcane during 2003-04 season was also declined due to non-availability of water for planting. Higher temperatures recorded during April-May months have still aggravated the drought situation. Due to deficit rainfall during the months of August, September the production of new flush in cashew was badly affected and ultimately less flowering was observed which lead to severe reduction of yields. Mango recorded good yields during this year.

2003 2004

1.

Plan of the Research Station

:

-

a. Name of the Research Station

:

Regional Agricultural Research Station, Anakapalle

b. Name of the Head of the Station

:

Dr.K.Subrahmanyam,
Associate Director of Research

c. Year of Establishment

:

1913

d. Area in hectares

:

41.74 ha

1. Total area

:

41.74 ha

2. Dry

:

12.37 ha

3. Wet

:

2.3 ha

4. Irrigated fry

:

14.3 ha

5. Roads, Buildings, Channels

:

10.77 ha

6. Grazing lands or pastures

:

Nil

7.Cultivated area

:

28.97 ha

8. Cultivable but not -cultivated during the year

:

-

9. Land not brought under
cultivation

:

Nil

10. Orchard

:

2.0 ha

e. Source wise area irrigated in the stations ( Season)


Source of irrigation

Area irrigated (ha)

Kharif

Rabi

Total

Cahals

-

-

-

Open wells

-

-

-

Tube wells

2.3

14.3

16.6

Any other sources

- - -

Popular articles:

  • Vathavaran kalushyam Nivaranaku Chetal pempakam melu Suseela and Dr.K.Subrahmanyam Mana Rythuvani October 2003
  • Udyanavana Pantalatho Upauthpathulu Agrigold Swarna Sedyam T.Suseela and Dr.K.Subrahmanyam April, 2004

Sl.No

Name of the article

Author (s)

Published in

Volume No. & Page No.

1.

Fertility status of soils and integrated plant nutrients supply for increasing sugarcane productivity in soil of North Coastal Andhra Pradesh

P.Jamuna1; K.Ramalinga Swamy2; N.V.Naidu3 and K.Subrahmanyam 4

Andhra Agricultural Journal (Presented the research paper by Dr.P.Jamuna during the Normal Seminar held on Natural Resource management on 28-30, January, 2004

Spl. Golden Jubilee issue, January, 2004

2.

Plant uptake of sulphur as related to charges in HI reducible and total sulphur fractions in soils (research paper from Ph.D. Resis)

K.M.Gol1 and P.Jmuna2

Plant and soil (year 2003)

Vol. 250 Page No. 1-13

3.

Economic returns through use of chemical fertilizers in integration with organic manures in sugarcane

P.Jamuna1; K.Ramalinga swamy2; N.V.Naidu3 and K.Subrahmanyam4

Presented the research paper in 21st R & D meeting held on 17-18, October, 2003 at Kakinada.

4.

Effect of mulching and integrated nutrient management in rainfed sugarcane

P.Jamuna1; K.Ramalinga swamy2; N.V.Naidu3 and K.Subrahmanyam4

Presented the research paper in 65th Annual convention of STAI conducted on 22-24, August 2003 at bhubaneswar (Orissa)/

5.

Land use planning in relation to soil0fite characteristics and rainfall chapertization under coastal Agro Ecosystem in Andhra Pradesh

K.Ramalinga Swamy1; P.Jamuna2 and D.

The paper was presented in National seminar held on Soil survey and land use planning held at NBSS & LUP, Nagpur on 20-21, January, 2004

6.

Recent approaches in the methods or determining soil sulphur minarilization-in relation to plant sulphur availability

P.Jamuna

The paper was presented in National seminar held on Gramin Samridhi conducted on 10-13, March 2004, organised by faculty of management stydies, IIRM (Indian Institute of Rural Management), Jaipur, Rajastan.

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